Happy Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving Feast

“The year was 1637 . . . 700 men, women, and children of the Pequot Tribe gathered for their Annual Green Corn Dance in the area that is now known as Groton, Connecticut. While they were gathered in this place of meeting, they were surrounded and attacked by mercenaries of the English and Dutch. The Indians were ordered from the building as they came forth, they were shot down. The rest were burned alive in the building. The next day, the Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony declared: A day of Thanksgiving, thanking God they had eliminated over 700 men, women and children.” – From the Documents of Holland, 13 Volume Colonial Documentary History, letters and reports from colonial officials to their superiors and the King in England and the private papers of Sir William Johnson, British Indian Agent for the New York colony for 30 years.

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4 Comments »

  Gravatar Joshua "the RED" Allard wrote @ December 1st, 2005 at 4:26 pm

Good. Those dirty brown people deserved what they got. I thank my lucky stars everyday we killed as many as we did. I wish I could go over myself and fight for freedom. That’s why I raise my turkey leg to the troops over there every Thanksgiving. Wait, I forgot which injustice I was talking about…

  Gravatar Nathan Gibbs wrote @ December 1st, 2005 at 5:12 pm

Good one… hey, I was excited to see your site up. it’s great to see your work online. I look forward to more…

  Gravatar vincent steinhauer wrote @ September 28th, 2006 at 10:06 am

there is only one problem in checking the references of this researched phenomenon the said indian agent william johnson whom is credited with an account of this action would have only arrived in the americas in 1734 almost 60 years after the slaughter was to have occured.
i have no problem understanding the genocide that happened to indigenous nations here on turtle island but the research should ‘hang’ together.

  Gravatar Nathan wrote @ September 29th, 2006 at 5:00 pm

Vincent, I appreciate your search for accuracy. The reference above does cite more than just this man (it doesn’t cite an personal account, just that there were accounts in his collection of papers), who no doubt was knowledgeable of past events. I’ll gladly change the citation above if you can provide more details to cite. Thanks.

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